Skip to main content

Full text of "Annual catalogue"

See other formats


1 \- 



V 













fg»mi 



OREGON. 




jff[nnual Catalogue? 



YAMHILL COUNTY REPORTER STEAM PRINT. 
McMinnville, Oregon. 



BOARD OF 

NAMES. 

Rev. R. Whitaker 

Rev. R. C. Hill 

Rev. A. R Medbuky 

Hon. J. N. Dolph 

A. C. Chandler 


TRUSTEES. 

address.. 
.Salem 
. . . Albany 

.Philadelphia 
. Portland 
. . . McMinnville 


TERM EX1 


»ires. 
.18'.)! 

.189J 
it 

a 
1898 




















A. C. Davis 






Rev. A. J. Hunsaker 

Amasa Sanders 


. . .Independence 
. McMinnville 






J. E. Magers, Esq 

Rev. C. JVL Hili 

Rev. John Gordon, I). D 

David Hurst 

Hon. W. C. Johnson, LL. D.. 
Hon. Henry Failing 


. . Portland 

. Salem 

Oregon City 
. . Portland 
























1 1 

?ident 
retary 
i surer 

rman 
retary 




Hon. Joseph Cravens 

D. C. Latourette 

Rev. R. McKillop 

N. J. Blagkn 


Independence 

. Oregon City 
McMinnville 
. Portland 














Pre 




Officers o 
Rev C M Hill 


f the Board. 




A. C. Chandler 




Sec 1 




Hon. W. C. Johnson, LL. D 




Tre* 

Chai 




Executive 
J. E. Magers 


Committee. 




A. C. Chandler. . 




Sec 




A. M. Sanders, Rev. R. McKillop, Rev. R. 


Whitakee. 





FACULTY. 

T. G. BROWNSON, President, 
History, Latin, Philosophy. 

EMANUEL NORTHUP, 

Greek, Mathematics. 

*W. F. FARGO, 
Natural Science. 

Mrs. T. G. BROWNSON, 
Modern Languages. 

JULIA H. BARRETT, 

Music. 



Secured for the coming year. 



McMINNVILLE CDLLE&E 

McMinnville, Dregon, 

T, G-, BrawnsDn, President, 



^>o03§EO<K- 



This College has just closed its third year of work under the present administration. 
They have been years of steady growth. The growth in the finances has been especially 
encouraging, the last two years the regular income meeting every dollar 
of the regular expenses. This is a new experience in the history of the college, 
and a fact of remarkable significance in its bearing upon future growth. 
The Failing Fund CQmplBted, 

The special financial feature of the last year was the completion of the Failing fund. 
This gives the college hereafter the income of $15,000 over and above its income to the 
present time. 

ThB Library G-reatly Enlarged, 

During the last year also over eight hundred volumes, nearly all standard 
works, have been added to the library; thus giving greatly enlarged facilities for literary 
research. An enlarged library has long been one of the most pressing needs of the col- 
lege. This need has now been met, in part, through the Executors of the A. W. 
Kinney estate. The few months that the books have been in the college, they have 
been found of untold value. 

A FrDfassnr nf the Natural Sciences, 
One of the most pressing needs of the college for years has been a teacher of the nat- 
ural sciences. it is with great pleasure that the notice can now be given to all the 
friends of the college that Mr W. F. Fargo, a recent graduate of Colgate University, one 
of the best colleges of New York, has been added to the faculty to give his special atten- 
tion to these important branches. 

The Coming Year, 

Because of the above facts, the advantages offered to students the coming year will 
be greatly superior to those of any preceding year. With an enlarged income, an 
enlarged library and an increased teaching force, there is every reason to expect that 
the coming year will surpass all preceding years in real value to the students. 

The Needs nf the CnllegB 

A growing college has growing needs. We ought to have constant additions to our 
library, and a few hundred dollars at once to beautify the college grounds. But the 
special need of McMinnville College at the present time is active effort on the part of 
many of its friends to fill its halls with students. There are scores of young men in 
Baptist homes on this North Pacific Coast who ought to come to McMinnville this fall. 
There are other scores of young women who cannot afford to deny themselves of special 
preparation for the duties of life. There are scores of parents who ought to insist on 
their children coming to McMinnville. There are scores of pastors who can do very 
much towards filling the college with students. Let earnest effort begin at once, on the 
part of all friends of the college, to give the college the coming year a larger number of 
students than were ever before within her walls. The new catalogue will be out in a 
few weeks. If you desire one for yourself or for any friend, write to President T. G. 
Brownson at McMinnville. June 7, 1890. 



McMINNVILLE CDLLEGE 

McMinnvilla, Drag an, 

T, G-. Btdwiisdii, President, 



>>*NN><K- 



This College has just closed its third year of work under the present administration. 
They have been years of steady growth. The growth in the finances has been especially 
encouraging, THE LAST two years the regulae income meeting every dollar 
of the regular expenses. This is a new experience in the history of the college, 
and a fact of remarkable significance in its bearing upon future growth. 
The Failing Fund Completed, 

The special financial feature of the last year was the completion of the Failing fund. 
This gives the college hereafter the income of $15,000 over and above its income to the 
present time. 

The Library G-reatly Enlarged, 

During the last year also over eight hundked volumes, nearly all standard 
works, have been added to the library; thus giving greatly enlarged facilities for literary 
research. An enlarged library has long been one of the most pressing needs of the col- 
lege. This need has now been met, in part, through the Executors of the A. W. 
Kinney estate. The few months that the books have been in the college, they have 
been found of untold value. 

A Frnfassnr nf tha Natural Sciences, 

One of the most pressing needs of the college for years has been a teacher of the nat- 
ural sciences. It is with great pleasure that the notice can now be given to all the 
friends of the college that Mr W. F. Fargo, a recent graduate of Colgate University, one 
of the best colleges of New York, has been added to the faculty to give his special atten- 
tion to these important branches. 

The Coming Year, 

Because of the above facts, the advantages offered to students the coming year will 
be greatly superior to those of any preceding year. With an enlarged income, an 
enlarged library and an increased teaching force, there is every reason to expect that 
the coming year will surpass all preceding years in real value to the students. 

The Needs nf the CnllegB 

A growing college has growing needs. We ought to have constant additions to our 
library, and a few hundred dollars at once to beautify the college grounds. But the 
special need of McMinnville College at the present time is active effort on the part of 
many of its friends to fill its halls with studems. There are scores of young men in 
Baptist homes on this North Pacific Coast who ought to come to McMinnville this fall. 
There are other scores of young women who cannot afford to deny themselves of special 
preparation for the duties of life. There are scores of parents who ought to insist on 
their children coming to McMinnville. There are scores of pastors who can do very 
much towards filling the college with students. Let earnest effort begin at once, on the 
part of all friends of the college, to give the college the coming year a larger number of 
students than were ever before within her walls. The new catalogue will be out in a 
few weeks. If you desire one for yourself or for any friend, write to President T. G. 
Brownson at McMinnville. June 7, 1890. 



NAMES OF STUDENTS. 



Collegiate 
Academic 

Collegiate 
Academic 



NAMES RESIDENCE DEPARTMENT 

Florence Alexander Independence Academic 

Kay L. Antrim Wheatland 

Carrie Bailey .Willamina. 

Alvin W, Baird Oregon City 

Alsea Baker McMinnville 

Lela Baker " 

OllieBell McCoy 

Edith Brown iNorth Yamhill 

William Brown Cheney, Wash 

Charles R. Bryant Portland 

Lena Burgan McMinnville 

Ella Cary Scio 

Lelah Carr Carlton 

Dean Cook McMinnville 

James H. Cook " 

Lynn Cook " 

Wilber Cook " 

Arthur S. "Cooper " " 

Daisy Davis West Chehalem " 

Ella Fryer North Yamhill 

Nellie M . Gardiner McMinnville " 

Chester D. Gifford. Spokane Fails, Wash " 

Florence Goulter Ilwaco, Wash. , .• . . . " 

Emma Hawley McMinnville " 

Mitchell Haynes Haynesville " 

A. B. Hemstock McMinnville " 

Myrtle Henderson " " 

Robert Henderson " ' ' 

Lorin L. Hewitt " " 

Wilber Hibbs " 

Clyde Hill Albany 

Rupert Hill " 

James W. Hobson. Centralia, Wash " 

Ruby Knott McMinnville " 

Nellie Latourette Oregon City " 

Nina Latourette " " " 

Lyman Latourette " ' ' ' ' 

Jordan Lynch McMinnville " 

Luella Lynch " " 

John Loder Carlton " 

George N. Maddock Heppner Collegiate 



6 

Colman Mark 


Aurora 


Acad 




Gertrude Mark 


t( 




Jewell Mark ... . 


<< 


i 




Jacob Mark 

Thomas Mark 


a 


t 


i 


it 


i 


< 


Anna Matthews 

Frank Matthews 


Carlton 


i 


; 


Mattie McCabe 

Cornelia McCown 

Leland W. McCredy . . . 

Arthur McPhillips 

Susie Millsap 


... McMinnville 

. . . . Oregon City 

.... Arlington, Wash 

McMinnville 

a 


i 


< 


Wizard Millsap 

Laura B. Myers 

Nettie Olds 

Ida Pagenkopf 

Lena Pagenkopf 

George E. Prunk 

Elmer Purvine 

J. P. Redmond 

Matthew Redmond ... 

Cora Robinson 

LoronzoRoot 

EffiieG. Sanders 

Sara Scott 

Willie Scott 


it 




. . . . Scio 

McMinnville 

...Wells 

it 


t 


< 


Arbuckle, Cal. ..'..... 

. . . . Zena 

. . .McMinnville 


Colle 

Acac 


giate 
emic 


. . Independence 

.... West Chehalem 




; 


. . . . Amity 

. . . . Carlton 




James W. Scott 

James Sharp 

Mary Etta Shurtleff . 

Farquher T. Shaw 

William Shaw 

Lena Shelton 

Hollis Shelton 


n 

! . . McMinnville 

it 




. North Powder 




a a 

. . .Carlton 




it 




Bert Shelton 


Ida J. Skinner 

Etta Stetson 

Frank Stetson. 


McMinnville 

. . .Seattle, Wash 

a a 


Colle 

Acad 

t 


giate 
emic 


Ralph Story 

Wendell P. Spotts 

Marian Sully 

Lela Vanetta 


. . . . McMinnville 

. . . South Saamich, B. C. 
. . . McMinnville 


i 
i 


i 
t 


Chas. H . Waltz 

Hattie M. Wright . 
Ward Wisecarver .... 
Daisy Young 

- - 


. North Powder 


t 


i 


. McMinnville 


( 




a 


t 


i 



COLLEGIATE COURSES 


7 
OF STUDY. 




THE CLASSICAL COURSE. 




Freshman Year, 




PALL TERM. 


WINTER TERM. 


SPRING TERM. 


Virgil 


Livy 


Livy 


Geometry 


Trigonometry 


Trg'metry and Surveying 


Xenophon 


Homer 

SophoraDPE Year. 


Homer 


Tacitus 


Horace 


Horace 


German 


German 


German 


' University Algebra 


University Algebra 


Herodotus 


1 German Literature 


(). T. History 

Junior Year, 


N. T. History 


i 
Sophocles 


Euripides 


French 


Logic 


Psychology 


Astronomy. 


Electives — 






German, Latin 


Latin, German 


Greek, German 


Chemistry 


Chemistry 


Botany, Geology 


General Geometry 


General Geometry 


History of England 


History of Greece 


History of France 


English Literature 


Greek Literature 


French Literature 

Senior Year. 




Physics 


Physics 


Moral Philosophy 


Greek Testament 


Greek Testament 


Political Economy 


Electives — 






Christian Evidences 


French 


International Law. 


French 


History of Philosophy 


Biblical Literature 


History of England 


History of the U. S. 


History of the U. S. 


English Literature 


American Literature 


American literature 



8 


THF SCIENTIFIC COURSE. 




Freshman Year. 




FALL TERM. 


WINTER TERM. 


SPRING TERM. 


Virgil 


Livy 


Livy 


Geometry 


Trigonometry 


Tig' me try and Surveying 


Zoology 


Rhetoric 

Sophomore Year. 


Botany 


Tacitus 


Horace 


Horace 


German 


German 


German 


University Algebra 


University Algebra 


IS. T. History 


German Literature 


0. T. History 

Junior Year. 


Geology 


Logic 


Psychology 


French 


German 


German 


Astronomy 


Electives — 






General Geometry 


General Geometry 


German 


Latin, Chemistry 


Chemistry, Latin 


History of England 


History of Greece 


History of France 


English Literature 


Greek Literature 


French Literature 

Senior Year. 




Physics 


Physics 


Moral Philosophy 


French 


French 


Political Economy 


Electives — 






German 


History of Philosophy 


International Law 


Christian Evidences 


History of the U. S. 


Biblical Literature 


History of England 


American Literature 


History of the U.S. 


English Literature 




American Literature 

... 1 



ACADEMIC COURSES 


9 

OF STUDY. 






THE CLASSICAL CDLTRSE. 






Junior Year. 






FALL TERM. 


WINTER TERM. 


SPRING TEI M. 




Arithmetic 
English ( rrammar 
Latin Grammar 
Physiology 


Arithmetic 
Latin Reader 
Rhetoric 
Physical Geography 

Middle Tear. 


Arithmetic 

Caesar 

Rhetoric 

Physical Geography 




Cspsar 

Algebra 
General History 


(Vsar 
Algebra 
General History 

Senior Year. 


Cicero 
Algebra 
History of Rome 




Cicero 
Algebra 
Greek Lessons 


Cicero 

Geometry 
Xenophon 


Virgil 
Geometry 
Xenophon 
0. T. History 






THE SCIENTIFIC CDLTRSE. 






Junior Year. 






Arithmetic 
English Grammar 
Latin Grammar 

Phisiology 


Arithmetic 
Latin Reader 
Rhetoric 
Physical Geography 

Middle Year. 


Arithmetic 

Caesar 

Rhetoric 

Physical Geography 




Caesar 
Algebra 
General History 


Caesar 
Algebra 
General History 

Senior Year. 


Cicero 
Algebra 
History of Rome 




Cicero 
Algebra 

History of Rome 
Latin Literature 


Cicero 
Geometry 
English Literature 


Virgil 
Geometry 
English Literature 
0. T. History 





m 










THE NORMAL COURSE. 






First Yeaj.. 






FMJr TERM. 


WINTER TKKM. 


SPRING IF I. M. 




Arithmetic 


Arithmetic 


Arithmetic 




English Grammar 


English ( rram mar 


English Grammar 




Geography 


Geography 


Geography 




U.S. History 


U. S. History 


U. S. History 




Reading 


Reading 


Reading 




Spelling. . 


Spelling 

SeGond Year.. 


Spelling. 




Arithmetic 


Arithmetic. 


Arithmetic 


■■ 


English Grammar 


Physical Geography 


Rhetoric 




Physiology 


Rhetoric 


Physical Geography 




Algebra 


Algebra 

Third Year, 


Algebra 




(ieneral History 


General History 


English Literature 




Algebra 


English Literature 


Roman History 




School Management 


Book-keeping 


Art of Teaching 




| 


THE BUSINESS COURSE. 






First Year. 






Arithmetic 


Arithmetic 


Arithmetic 




, English Grammar 


English Grammar 


English Grammar 


■. 


Geography 


Geography 


Geography 




U. S. History 


U. S. History 


U. S. History 




Reading 


Reading 


Reading 




Spelling 


Spelling 

Second Year, 


Spelling 




Arithmetic 


Arithmetic 


Arithmetic 




English Grammar 


Physical Geography 


Physical Geography 




Physiology 


Algebra 


Rhetoric 




Algebra 


Rhetoric 

Third Year. 


Algebra 




Algebra 


Geometry 


Geometry 




General History 


English Literature 


English Literature 




Roman History 


General History 


Roman History 




y, 


Book-keeping 







COLLEGIATE COURSES OF STUDY 



The Classical Course. 

This course extends through four years and is essentially the same as 
the classical course in Eastern colleges. In this course the foundations 
are broad, deep and substantial. Special attention is given to the three 
great disciplinary studies, Latin, Greek and Mathematics. The first great 
purpose of a college course is to give thorough discipline of mind. For 
this purpose, the study of Latin, Greek and Mathematics is of the high- 
est value. 

The Latin and the Greek languages are, also, unsurpassed store- 
houses of intellectual strength. These great masterpieces in history, 
poetry and oratory, have been studied with delight by the great scholars 
of all civilized nations. 

In this course the student not only gets thorough mental discipline 
but he also has the opportunity of entering those rich storehouses and of 
feeding upon this rich intellectual food. This course also gives excellent 
opportunity for the study of French, German, English. History and the 
Sciences. 

The Scientific Course, 

This is also a fours years' course. It has the same amount of Latin, 
no Greek ; but more French and German, and a more extended course 
of History and the Sciences. It is especially adapted to those who 
desire a more thorough course in Science, History and Modern 
Languages. The drift of educational thought to-day is towards a mure 
thorough mastery of the natural sciences, and a more exhaustive study 
of history. Modern languages are also receiving special attention. The 
aim is to make this course equal in every respect to the classical. 

Upon the successful completion of either one of these courses, the 
student is entitled to the degree of Bachelor of Arts. 

The graduates of either of these courses who have pursued literary 
or scientific studies for three years after graduation, are entitled to the 
degree of Master of Arts. 



12 

ACADEMIC COURSES OF STUDY, 



In the Academic Department there are four courses of study of three 
years each. The classical course is preparatory to the collegiate classical. 
It aims to give thorough preparation in Latin, Greek, Mathematics, His- 
tory and English Literature. The scientific course is preparatory to the 
collegiate scientific. It aims to give a thorough drill of three years in 
Latin, Mathematics, History, English Literature and Science, but has no 
Greek. Either is an excellent course for those who are not able to 
remain in school more than three years. The drill and discipline of 
mind secured by three years' careful study of Latin are the very best 
preparation for business life. The study of Latin is, also, one of the most 
practical studies that can be taken, giving at the same time a splendid 
drill in English grammar, and in the choice use of words. The normal 
course is especially adapted to those who are fitting themselves for 
teachers. The business course is especially adapted to fit young men 
and women for the practical duties of business life. 

Any student completing any one of these four courses is entitled to a 
certificate of graduation. The graduating exercises from this department 
will henceforth constitute one of the most interesting features of com- 
mencement week. 

Especial attention is here called to the fact that a student will 
receive much more benefit by entering upon one of these courses than by 
taking selected studies. These courses are arranged with a view of giving 
the student the most complete education he can obtain in the limited 
time of three years. Until there are high schools of a high grade all over 
the North Pacific coast, the Academic department of McMinnville 
College will be a necessity, and so long as this department is maintained, 
the very utmost effort will be put forth to build up and sustain a first- 
class academy — one that has no superior in the United States. The 
great need of the Pacific Coast to-day is not so much colleges as first-class 
academies — academies with liberal endowments and first class faculties. 
It is such an academy, first-class in every respect, and from which it will 
be a distinguished honor to graduate, that the trustees of McMinnville 
College are determined to build up in McMinnville. 

Students not desiring or not able to take a regular course, will be 
allowed to take any study with the regular class in the study, if they are 



13 

fitted to do so, but special classes for such students cannot be organized 
unless they are willing to pay extra. 

Requirements for Admission. 

For admission to the collegiate classical course, candidates will he 
examined in the studies of the academic classical course, or their equiva- 
lent. For admission to the collegiate scientific course, students will be 
examined in the studies of the academic scientific course, or their 
equivalent. For admission to the academic classical or academic scien- 
tific course, students will he examined in the studies of the "first year" 
of the normal course. The studies of this year are arranged with a view 
to accommodate those students whose educational opportunities have 
been very limited. Students of 12 or 14 years of age, who have availed 
themselves of ordinary educational advantages, will be able to enter upon 
the studies of this first year of the normal course. When they have 
mastered the studies of this year, they will he able to enter the junior 
year of the academic classical or scientific course. Many students will 
be able to enter the second year of the normal or business course. 
Students taking two studies in the collegiate department will pay collegi- 
ate tuition. The courses of study are given in full on the preceding 
pages. 



14 

MUSIC COURSE. 



Piano. 



PREPARATORY DEPARTMENT. 

New England Conservatory Method, Books I and II, with Clementi 
Sonatines. 

FERST YEAR. 

Bertini Studies, op. 29 and 32. Czerny, op. 229 parts 1 and 2. Scales 
from memory, in unisons, tenths and sixths. Kuhlau Sonatinas, Haydn 
Sonatas, Loeschhorn Technical Studies. 

SECOND YEAR. 

Heller, op. 46 and 45. Czerny, op. 299, Books III and IV, Mozart 
and Schubert sonatis, Loeschhorn Technical Studies. 

THIRD YEAR. 

Cramer Studies, parts 1, 2 and 3. Bach's two part inventions. 

Kulluck's Octave Studies. Loeschhorn Technical Studies. Men- 

dellssohn's Songs without words. Beethoven Sonatas. Chopin Waltzes. 
Elements of Harmony, Emery. 

FOURTH YEAR. 

Clementi Gradus ad Parnassum, parts 1 and 2. Bach's Well-Tem- 
pered Clavichord. Chopin Nocturnes and Ballades. Concertos, by 
Mendellssohn, Hummel and Beethoven ; also, concert pieces, by Men- 
dellssohn, Weber, Rubenstein and Liszt. Elements of Harmony, Emery. 

All pupils entering the four years course in piano, must have a 
knowledge of the rudiments of music, and must have completed the work 
of the preparatory department or its equivalent. 

The course of study in piano-forte playing is systematically arranged, 
and pupils who complete the course will be graduated in music with an 
appropriate diploma. The time occupied in completing this course will 
depend upon the ability of the pupil and the proportion of time devoted 
to musical study. 

Vocal Culture. 

Classes will be organized in vocal culture at moderate prices, if there 
are those who desire it. 



15 
GENERAL INFORMATION. 



Location. 

McMinnville College is located just outside the city limits of Mc- 
Minnville, Oregon. McMinnville is the county seat of Yamhill county, 
one of the hest agricultural counties of the state. The city is having a 
healthy and substantial growth, there having been built recently a fine 
court house and an excellent public* school building, aside from many 
private residences. Both city and county are taking an increasing in- 
terest in education. McMinnville is easily accessible from every part of 
the North Pacific coast, being situated on the Southern Pacific Railroad, 
west side division, 50 miles ^outh of Portland. From all points south of 
McMinnville there is direct connection ; by the way of Albany and Cor- 
vallis ; by stage from Salem to McCoy and thence by the Southern Pa- 
cific to McMinnville, or by way of Portland. For accessibility, for health- 
iness, for attractive and beautiful surroundings, for intelligent and Chris- 
tian society ; in a word, for all the elements the that make up a first-class 
location for an institution of higher learning, McMinnville stands pre- 
eminent. 

Building and Grounds. 

The college has a campus of 33 acres, admirably adapted for the pur- 
pose and beautiful for situation. Upon this campus there was built in 
1882 one of the finest buildings for educational purposes to be found on 
the Pacific coast. The building is 106 feet in length, 79 in breadth, and 
four stories in height. The basement story contains accommodations for 
a boarding department ; the second affords a commodious chapel, Presi- 
dent's rooms, class rooms, etc. ; the third and fourth, class rooms, library, 
a number of eligible rooms for students, and Philergian hall. 

Government. 

The institution, though founded and equipped by the Baptist de- 
nomination, offers its advantages to all shades of opinion alike. The 
denomination that has been, in all ages, the champion of religious liberty, 
will assuredly be the last to infringe upon the conscientious convictions 
of others. It is the only Baptist College in the state of Oregon. 



16 

The Aim of the College. 

McMinnville College was founded and has been foHtered with the 
purpose of making it one of the very best schools on the Pacific Coast. 
The aim is to give its students the choicest culture and the best educa- 
tion possible at the least possible expense to them. The Faculty and 
Trustees are more concerned about the character of the school than the 
number of its students. They are anxious that the students who gather 
here shall here receive such discipline of mind and culture of heart as 
shall fit them to be eminently successful in whatever calling or occupa- 
tion they may follow through life. 

Discipline. 

Self-government is the ideal at McMinnville College. Students are 
expected to conform to the usages of good society, and to conduct them- 
selves as they would in a refined, well-ordered home. Only those who 
are willing to do so are desired as pupils. No set of rules to cover all 
cases can be laid down. A high moral sense is necessary to guide a 
student in a society like this. If a student does not have this and it can 
not be developed in him, his parents will be notified, after a due trial, to 
remove him from the school. Tliis is not a reform school; young men 
are expected to gives evidence of manhood, and young women of 
womanhood. 

Text Books. 

Only a partial list of text books is here given. Arithmetic, Fish; 
Grammar, Reed & Kellogg; Algebra, Olney; Geometry, Trigonometry, 
Wentworth ; U. S. History, Barnes; General History, Barnes; Rhetoric, 
Hart ; Physiology, Steele; Physical Geography, Appleton; Latin Gram- 
mar and Reader, Harkness; Harkness' Preparatory Course in Latin 
Prose Authors ; Greek Grammar, Goodwin ; First Lessons in Greek, 
White ; Anabasis, Goodwin ; Roman History, Leighton ; English Litera- 
ture, Shaw; Logic, Jevon ; Psychology, Hill. 

English Composition and Elocution. 

During the last year excellent work was done in this department 
both in essay writing and in speaking. Kindly criticism in essay writ- 
ing and private drilj in elocution are furnished without extra charge to 



17 

all students. It is the fault of the student if he does not receive much 
benefit in this line of work, as regular exercises are held both in writing 
and in speaking. 

The plan of having Friday evening musical and literary entertain- 
ments, to which the puhlic are invited, the exerciees consisting of essays, 
declamations, recitations, orations, music, etc., has proved a decided 
success. This work will be continued and more attention paid to it. 
This department will receive more and more attention year by year. 

The English Bible. 

Special attention is called to the fact that by recent action of the 
Board of Trustees, the English Bible is henceforth to be a text-book in 
McMinnville College. This book, whose study enabled Milton, Shake- 
speare, Dante, and scores of great authors to write their immortal works ; 
whose study has given hundreds of men remarkable power in the use of 
the English language ; whose study has changed the civilization of na- 
tions, has been excluded from the curriculum of the christian college alto- 
gether too long. It is hoped that at no distant day there will be in 
McMinnville College an English Bible professorship. Until that day 
comes, the President will have this study in charge and give to it as 
earnest effort as his duties will permit, paying especial attention to Old 
and New Testament history and to the literature of the Bible. r 

Library. 

Three years ago ''McMinnville College Library Day" was inaugu- 
rated. The plan is to have the Baptist Sunday Schools of the state take 
collections on that day for the college library. This movement received 
the hearty sanction of the State Convention and several of the Associa- 
tions. The Sunday Schools have observed it j r et only in part. It has 
been thus far fairly successful. If the Sunday Schools throughout the 
state will observe it, it will give the college a small sum each year to buy 
additions to its library. Through this library fund, valuable addition 8 
have been made the last year ; also through the gifts of individuals. 
Through the influence of Hon. J. N. Dolph, valuable books are received 
from Washington from time to time. 

Special attention is called to the gift to the library from the executors 
of the Albert W. Kinney estate. This gift of $1100 has been expended by 



18 

the exee.ntors in standard books during the last year, the selection being 
made with great care. These books have been received and placed in 
the library. This gift is timely, and will be of untold value to the 
efficiency ot the college. Let no one suppose, however, that the college 
will now be in no special need of further gifts. A first-class college 
library c >sts thousands of dollars. Great libraries grow by the addition 
of a few books at a time. 

Reading Room. 

The reading room is open to all students. The coming year it will 
contain among others the following papers : The Examiner, The Stand- 
ard, The Christian Herald, The Pacific Baptist, The Old Testament 
Student, The Baptist Teacher, The Worker, The Missionary Magazine, 
The Helping Hand, The Missionary Review, The Statesman, The Voice, 
and local and state papers. Any contribution of periodicals to the 
reading room wfll be thankfully received and cared for. 

Societies. 

The Philergian Society, composed of young ladies and gentlemen, 
meets regularly each Saturday evening. The exercises, consisting of 
singing, debates, essays, recitations, orations, declamations, etc., are of 
great value te the students. 

The Missionary Society holds a public meeting once a month. These 
meetings are growing in interest and in value. During the present year, 
there has been a systematic study of various mission fields. 

There is also among the students an organization of the Young 
Men's Christian Association and Young Women's Christian Association. 
These hold meetings regularly for the study of the Bible and for religious 
culture. These meetings have proved to be of great benefit to many 
students, encouraging them in christian work and fitting them for larger 
usefulness in after years. 

Social Culture. 

It is the belief of many that no place is more favorable for the social 
development of students than a well-conducted school for both sexes. 
Students from a distance will receive great advantage by rooming in the 
building and entering into the home-life of the school. The intimate 



19 

relation of pupils to their teacher is most important. The social inter- 
course with fellow-students is very beneficial. The President lives in the 
building and boards in the boarding ciub with the students. 

Religious Culture. 

In selecting a school for their children, parents are naturally anxious 
about religious influences. This college was founded to promote christian 
culture. Every teacher is a professed christian. The Baptist church of 
McMinnville takes special interest in the religious culture of students. 
Many of the students are earnest christians and deeply interested in their 
fellow students. Firmly believing that intellectual culture and religious 
culture should be closely united, patrons of the college may rest assured 
that earnest efforts will be put forth to make the religious atmosphere 
healthy to the best culture of the students. 

Aid to Students. 

It is the aim of the Trustees to have McMinnville College always 
accessible to young men and women of limited means, especially such as 
desire an education that they may become useful in some form of Chris- 
tian work. Direct aid is not given to any extent, but a number of stu- 
dents are each year furnished with work by the friends of the college to 
pay in part their expenses. A boy or girl of pluck and perse verence can 
work out an education, and is encouraged to do so. Applications for 
work should be made to the President at an early day and accompanied 
with suitable references. Young men with the ministry in view and 
young women who desire to fit themselves to become missionaries are 
especially invited to correspond with the President and every effort will 
be put forth to help such secure a thorough education. 

Endowment. 

The college has property and endowment enough to remove from 
every mind the last shadow of a doubt as to the permanency of the in- 
stitution, but it has great need of a larger endowment. The completing 
of the Josiah Failing Professorship has been the crowning financial 
feature of the present year. The interest of this fund of $15,000 is now 
available for current expenses, enabling the college to make a great 
advance movement the coming year. This of course is but the beginning 



20 

of the endowment that is needed. It is, however, sufficient to greatly 
encourage all friends of the college. 

A Professor of the Natural Sciences. 

For years one of the most pressing needs of the college has heen the 
building up of the Scientific Department. The completion of the 
Failing Fund opens the way for this important work. Professor W. F. 
Fargo, a graduate of Colgate University, one of the best colleges of New 
York, has been added to the faculty to give special attention to the 
natural sciences. This advance step will be of great value in the build- 
ing up of the college. 

Rooms and Boarding. 

Room rent in the building is from three to five dollars a term for 
each student. Each room is furnished with a stove ; the student 
furnishes everything else. If desirable or necessary two students will 
occupy one room. Only two students are allowed to occupy one room 
except by special permission of both the Executive committee and the 
President of the college. By two students rooming together, considerable 
can be saved in furnishing and heating the room. For several years 
there has been a boarding department in the basement of the college 
building. It is expected that arrangements will be made for the coming 
year so as to furnish board at a reasonable rate. Joining the rooms of 
the President are several fine rooms that will be reserved for a time for 
young ladies. This is an excellent chance for young ladies to room and 
board in the college with every advantage of a home in a christian 
family. Several students frequently club together and hire a small 
house or rooms and do their own cooking, thus getting board at from a 
dollar to a dollar and a half a week 

Expenses. 

Tuition in College department, per term $ 14 00 

Tuition in Academic department, per term 11 00 

Room rent, per term, each student 3, 4, 5 

Fuel, per year, each room 8, 10, 12 

Music, piano or organ, one lesson a week, per lesson 60 

Music, piano or organ, two lessons a week, per lesson 50 

Use of piano one hour per day, per month 1 00 

Diploma, A. B. degree 5 00 

From the above it will be easily seen that the student can spend the 



Ll 

whole year in McMinnville College for less than $200, aside from his 
clothes, his incidental expenses and his traveling expenses. It is de- 
sired, both for the good of the student and the college, that parents and 
guardians see that students do not spend money in unnecessary and 
injurious ways. 

Payment oT Bills. 

Tuition, room rent and fuel are to be paid in advance ; daring the 
first week of each term, or the first week in school. Music lessons and 
use of piano may be paid in advance or at the end of every half term. 
Students are required to show to the president their receipts. Those who 
are delinquent in the payment of bills may be denied the privileges of the 
recitation room until satisfactory settlement is made. 

Calendar for 1890-91. 

The school year is divided into three terms, these terms beginning as 
follows : 

First term begins Tussday, Sept 9, 1890 

Second terra begins Monday, Dec. 1, 1890 

Third term begins Monday, March '.). 1S91 

Baccalaureate Sermon Sunday morning. May ;'»1 

Educational Sermon Sunday evening, May 31 

Examinations Monday and Tuesday, June 1 and 2 

Anniversary Philergian Society Monday evening, June 1 

Educational Address Tuesday evening, June J 

Students' Reunion Wednesday afternoon. June 3 

Graduating Exercises Wednesday evening. June :i 

Standing Regulations. 

1. The exercises of the institution are opened every morning by 
reading from the Scriptures, prayer and singing; and all students are 
expected to be present. 

2. Each student is expected to attend divine service every Sunday 
morning. 

3. Before leaving school or town, all are required to report to the 
President. 

4. Examinations are held at the close of each term. All recitations 
and examinations are marked on the scale of 100 ; and an average of 70 
is required before leaving a study. 

5. Written reports in scholarship and deportment will be sent to the 



22 

parents or guardians of each student at the close of each term ; also the 
number of unexcused absences from recitations, study hours, chapel and 
church. 

6. Students, who, through carelessness or negligence, injure the 
buildings or other property of the college shall be assessed by the Presi- 
dent sufficiently to repair such damage, and the amount shall be collected 
by the secretary of the Board of Trustees, and, in general terms, all will 
be held responsible for good order and the diligent use of their time. 

7. Students are required to observe as study hours from 9 a. m. to 
4 p. m. and from 7 p. m. to 9 p. m. After 10 p. m. all students are expected 
to remain quietly in their rooms. 

8. Any pupil who shall be absent from any recitation or study hours 
without excuse, shall be notified by the President when such absences 
shall reach five in number. When such absences shall reach ten, the 
President shall report the fact to the parents or guardian of the student. 
When such absences shall reach fifteen, the pupil may be suspended. 

9. It will be regarded as a serious breach of the rules of this institu- 
tion, for students to drink intoxicating liquors, to have it about their 
persons, to enter any brewery or saloon where such liquors are furnished, 
to attend any billiard saloon, or to use tobacco in any form, in or about 
the college building or campus. 

A Word to Students. 

Do not fail to be present on the first day of the first term with the 
determination to stay in school the full year. Your school days are 
passing by very rapidly, and you cannot afford to lose a single week from 
school the coming year. Remember too that classes are formed and that 
work begins the first day. Then make up your mind to enter the first 
day upon one of the regular courses of study. Both for discipline of 
mind and for immediate practical benefit, you will accomplish much 
more by entering a regular course than in any other way. Remember 
also that you can obtain a thorough education, if you will. Do you 
desire to fit yourself for the duties and responsibilities of life ? Do you 
desire to fit yourself to fill a position of usefulness and honor ? Do you 
desire to be the graduate of a college that has a magnificent future ? 
Your desire may become a reality if you are willing to make self-denial 



23 

and spend a few years in hard work. No matter how poor you are in 
pocket, if you are determined to go through college, you can do it. Will 
you do it ? 

A Word to Parents. 

If you cannot give you sons and daughters anything else, give them 
a good education. It may call for self-denial and sacrifice on your part, 
but you can well afford to make it. Try and keep them in school every 
school day in the year. Then remember that it is of the utmost import- 
ance in what school you educate your sons and daughters. You cannot 
afford to educate them in any other than a christian school. If you are 
a Baptist you cannot afford to educate them in any other than a Baptist 
school. If you are a Baptist in Oregon you cannot afford to educate them 
in any other school than McMinnville College. 

Special Request. 

You who receive this catalogue will receive it because you are be- 
lieved to be deeply interested in higher education. Your help in the 
building up of McMinnville College is earnestly solicited. There are 
many ways in which you can do so. You can speak a good word for the 
college. You can place this catalogue in the hands of persons whose 
thoughts and hearts may be turned toward the college. You can send 
the President names of persons who might be favorably influenced by a 
catalogue or a personal letter from him. You can remember this school 
in your prayers ; you can remember it in you will. The college looks to 
you for help in one or all of these various ways. See to it that she does 
not look in vain. 

The Outlook. 

In considering the outlook, many things must be remembered. It 
must be remembered that the population of Oregon is considerably less 
than half a million. It must be remembered that the Williamette Valley 
alone, aside from Roman Catholic schools, has not less than seven col- 
leges, a state normal school, and thirteen academies. With two excep- 
tions, these are all within sixty miles of McMinnville. Remembering 
these things, the outlook of McMinnville is certainly full of hope. 
The college has fine grounds and a fine building, an increasing endow- 
ment, an excellent faculty, a strong Board of Trustees — all backed up by 



24 

a great denomination that is taking an increasing interest in higher edu- 
cation. The last year has been an excellent one — by far the best finan- 
cial year in the history of the college. The college certainly has an 
encouraging outlook. 

Correspondence with young men and women, especially with parents 
and guardians, is solicited, and any information not found in this 
catalogue will be gladly furnished by addressing the President, 

T. G. BRCWNSON, 

McMinnville, Oregon. 



3 0112 105813973